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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
at one and appreciate for what it is, the terrain and environment it survives in, you're missing something. >> reporter: they are highly endangered predators, targeted by poachers for their pelts and killed by farmers for attacking their livestock. they're now believed to be between 100 and 200 in afghanistan, so, finding one is not an easy task. especially in a war-torn country, where roves packs of taliban fighters are always a threat. >> so, this would be the volley up here. >> reporter: welcome to the mountainous border region in northeastern afghanistan. this is snow leopard country. among those on boone's experienced team? tracker hussein ali and fellow trapper john goodrich. >> trapping is a game of odds. we're trying to predict the exact spot. >> reporter: to catch their big cat, they must set a series of snares. >> and now we camouflage the loop and the pit. >> reporter: then, there's the transmitter, which will alert the team when a cat is caught. once it is set, all there is to do is wait. >> there's a signal. beep, beep, beep. >> reporter: it's the middle of the night
and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public, and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america. but americans have no idea they come from alec, unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. and there was a proposal to provide special-needs scholarships. and lo and behold all of a sudden i come back to wisconsin, and what gets introduced? get ready. i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special-needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sound
is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree is from a small town called meeker, colorado in the white river national forest in the high mountain areas of colorado. and it's a a spruce tree and 73 feet tall and happens to be 74 years old. it's only the third time in colorado's history that colorado has provided the capitol christmas tree and i'm particularly proud of that since i'm a colorado resident. yay, colorado! [cheers and applause] >> we call this the people's tree for good reason and that's because it comes from our public lands, which are owned by al
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
and another in control of the house, you are going to have a lot of give and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolves many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shutdown in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are ma
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make meone happy.♪.♪it's so e ♪make just one heart to heart you - you sing to♪ ♪one smile that cheers you ♪one face that lights when it nears you.♪ ♪and you will be happy too. 44 minutes after the top of the hour. turkey deployed pariot missiles . tell help to defend against possible attacks. customers of new jersey power company jcp&l are up in arms and they are about to be slammed with a hurricane price hike. they want to raise the monthsly bills by 1.4 percent. >> steve: a hol
. have a safe and secure maritime environment, good for the economy, and good for the american people n my estimation this legislation fulfills that obligation. i urge its passage today. just briefly want to thank once gren mr. lobiondo for his in-- once again mr. lobiondo for his incredible work in bringing this legislation to passage. with that i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey. mr. lobiondo: i rise in support of house resolution 825. 825 covers the coast guard through fear 2014, a level that allows the administration's requested military pay increase for fiscal year 2013 and provide for military pay increase for fiscal year 2014 at a level consistent with c.b.o.'s estimate on the rate of inflation. the bill provides funding for the coast guard of levels that will reverse the irresponsible cuts proposed by the obama administration and will ensure the service has what it needs to successful conduct its missions. the legislation includes critical provisions that will have the coast guard and its service members greater parity with
a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as national security hawks conservative can see the idea of producing more in our country, leaving more resources at home and spending less of our wealth abroad. so we see this as a way of not creating a zero sum game but doing something different, which is create ago consensus in order to get something done in the next congress. and so we're excited for the next congress. we're excited to work with all legislators and the administration to implement these recommendations and see it through to their fulfillment. right now i'd like to call mr. smith, fred smith, who's the championship, c.e.o., president and founder of fedex. he needs to introduction. he burns about 1.5 billion gallons of fuel a day -- a year, sorry. [laughter] that would really be a problem. but the truth is, you know, the fedex and what it's done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age, and what they see both in terms of the economic growth of our country, you know, because they touch every industry, as we
, a report about the problem will be presented to the city council's transportation and environment committee. >>> the public has been invited to a meeting tonight about the search for a new police chief for san jose. during that meeting, city officials will ask for ideas about what quality should be considered in evaluating candidates for the job. the meeting is due to begin at 67:30 at the mayfair community center. >>> want to check in with tara again. >> there is a new accident on 680 southbound. there is a car blocking the lane there. it doesn't appear to be causing too much of a backup. right now we're gonna head outside and you can see the east shore freeway is pretty much a mess. i have red arrows that about all the way from the bay bridge up to richmond. so different yourself some extra time if you need to head west on interstate 80. up next we'll take a look at the bay bridge toll plaza. you can see there is a lot of traffic here. it's been like this since about 6:00 this morning. give yourself some extra time if you need to head into san francisco. 280 in san jose, the traffic is no
manual labor job. we are moving from that manual labor, low-skill jobs environment, to one in which he will have to have more education and skills. that is the reality of globalization, and i do not think you will have to avoid that. where to put more attention to and on getting people the skills -- we have to put more attention and getting people the skills. we will never have thousands of people sitting at sewing machines making t-shirts. host: another area where your groups seemed to disagree is whether the unemployment insurance creates a disincentive to look for work. mr. josh bivens, we start with you on this subject. caller: the two -- guest: the two previous callers identified the root problem -- there are not enough jobs. the ratio is still over three- to-one. if we could wave a magic wand, we would still have a large majority of unemployed workers looking for jobs. that is not a problem of skills. it is not a problem of employers dying to hire, but there are not the people out there. we just do not have the demand for services in the economy. that is like cutting off this sou
and not improve the environment. we need a discussion about tax policy but follow the principle, the greater the gain the greater the burden you bare. many conservatives think that. they are running the debate and totally ahistorical. >> i think this is a really important point about what else favors the wealthy in our tax system. one of the critical issues is the system of deductions. today, the way deductions work, the mortgage deductions or charitable deduction. if you give $10,000, you do $10,000 of a mortgage amount in a year. because of the way rates work as a deduction, it's $3500 if you are in the rate of 35%. and $1500 if you are a middle class family in the 15% marginal rate. it's $10,000. same for two families and much bigger value. it's upsidedown. in a tax plan we put forward, we addressed that issue. we transformed everything into an 18% credit. it's fair across the board. deductions are a way, a big way the tax system favors the well off and well-to-do. it's one of the reasons people are cynical about taxes. conservatives who argue about making the system fair. the best way is
of environment. i don't know, i think i need these. >> mike: but clayton, i know you do this i follow you on twitter. you look at techie stuff like she looks at boots. >> clayton: i do, but i don't impulse buy them because i research them. >> alisyn: you're different 21% of the respondents of the survey say that they do spend, they do impulse buy technology. >> clayton: i think where they get you, this is what they do, they get you, right? it's the checkout aisle. you're in home depot and have lumber on a cart and bringing the lumber up to the front and check out and suddenly a box of chicklets up there, i need some gum and kit cats. >> mike: my co-anchor in philadelphia, chanel marie jones, where she buys her socks? whole foods at a grocery store. >> clayton: she wants organic cotton. >> mike: they're hideous, horrifying. >> alisyn: impulse buy. >> mike: impulse. >> clayton: that's why the walgreen's and other stores worked so well when other stores have gone out of business, drug stores and you're there to get a prescription and you know what-- >> i didn't know we were blowing 200 a
because it's such a masculine environment, you try to mask everything. if you hurt your ankle, you fake it and run it off like nothing's wrong. especially if you have an emotional or mental problem. you're certainly going to mask it. along the way if you don't you're going to get weeded out. football is a game of attrition. the weak don't make it to the top levels. so you mask any issues or demons that you may have so that you can get to that top level. i think it's a disservice, quite honestly, to the individuals in the games. because statistics will tell you that there are a couple guys in the nfl that have mental issues and it doesn't get addressed often enough. >> back to joe linta for a second. we know jovan went to the field and the facility and he talked to his coaches. i mean, he was talking to them with a gun to his head. why do you think his instinct after he kills his girlfriend, the baby in the other room, would be to go and thank his coaches? >> i think the instinct would have been the kind of young man that he was and the way he was raised that, you know, he probably -- i
around you and we all are products of our environment. the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of fire fights, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was it shall that's pretty long for some young people. we are there to help them out, find ways of doing the same thing they've been doing. when i wrote the book i want ed to describe the valley and the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back and thanked and i've never done anything in the military alone. i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actionses they've done. there are so many things that we don't hear about. >> our good friend sebastien younger who talked about stalked about your heroism, your unit, and the terrible conditions. i remember reading about it. it seemed remarkable what you did. what you did and how you describe it like so many other recipients that said in the past, i did my job. it was reflex. i was trained well and i was going to save my buddies. talk about that night. and also the reluctance to be called a hero. i've
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)